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Staff synergy, cohesiveness, and perseverance

Term of the Week: It Factor

vince dicecco

Vince is a dynamic and sought-after seminar speaker and author with a unique perspective on business development and management subjects, primarily in the decorated- and promotional-apparel industries. With 20+ years of experience in sales, marketing and training, he is an independent consultant to various decoration businesses looking to profit and sharpen their competitive edge. Visit his website or send an email to Vince@ypbt.com.

The It Factor is an intangible bond between work colleagues that drive each of them to collective excellence. Its components certainly include synergy, cohesiveness, and perseverance. It’s simply present, or it’s not. Perhaps there’s been a time from your work experience when you and several workers engaged in tackling an arduous project, and it was accomplished on time, on or under budget, and exceeded the expectations of all involved.

While there is no proven recipe to ensure your company can acquire the It Factor, there are many things you can do to cultivate what potential exists in your shop. Recognize, reward, and reinforce any behavior that promotes teamwork. When someone from another department or business function chips in to help another—no matter how insignificant a task—be sure to express your appreciation for the effort publicly.

There is no definitive method to quantify it, but there are some questions to ask yourself that will hint to the amount of It Factor your business has or lack thereof. 

  • How many days per month/quarter/year are your workers absent from or late to work? Companies that have an abundance of the It Factor have a low number of no-shows.
  • How much time do your employees spend with each other outside of work? It Factor shops have groups of workers that attend social, church, school, and/or community group events together. 
  • When the end-of-the-workday whistle blows, do your people climb over each other to get out? If so, that is a strong example of a workforce that isn’t fully committed to seeing the job gets done correctly, entirely, and on-time.
  • When you have all-employee or departmental meetings, is there little to no debate on topics you expect there to be some discussion or differing opinions? Silence and patronizing head-nodding should not count as compliance or agreement. It Factor-rich businesses have spirited yet respectful dialogue about issues directly impacting the workers’ productivity, work conditions, purpose, job security, and compensation.